OFFICIAL GUIDE TO SHIP & YACHT REGISTRIES

Dominica

Shipowner Eligibility 

Vessels must be owned by a Dominica corporation, partnership, or citizen or national.
International owners are eligible to register as Foreign Maritime Entities or as an International Business Company, which requires each vessel to register at least one corporation under the International Business Companies Act of 1988.

In keeping with its mission as "The Flag of Responsibility," Dominica requires applicants to "honor the mariner" by demonstrating the financial capability to sustain their vessels and crews in the event of unforeseen circumstances.

About the Flag

Located between the islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe, Dominica is well deserving of its status as the Nature Island of the Caribbean, with lush tropical rain forests and 365 rivers coursing over 290 square miles of breathtaking terrain. An environmental mindset (The national motto is “Après Bondieu, C’est la Terre,” “After God, the Earth”) has preserved the beauty of this island, which is a popular ecotourism destination that remains unspoiled by the commercialism that has overrun other Caribbean countries. In the past decade, tourist arrivals have increased steadily at a rate of 12 percent per year.

Twenty-nine miles long and sixteen miles across at its widest point, the island is home to 89,000 residents, including 3,000 Carib Indians, descendants of the island’s original inhabitants. European eyes first sighted Dominica (pronounced “Doe-mee-NEE-kah”) on a Sunday in 1493. Later, the English and the French alternately owned the island.

A British colony until 1967, Dominica was granted full independence November 3, 1978. As a commonwealth, it operates on a parliamentary system, with the prime minister, chosen with the majority party, as chief executive; the president serves as ceremonial head of state. Its capital is the port city of Roseau; Portsmouth is a second active port. Agriculture is the mainstay of the Dominica economy, with bananas as the chief crop, along with citrus, mangoes, root crops, and coconuts. Its manufacturing industry produces soap, coconut oil, copra, furniture, cement blocks, and shoes. Major trading partners are the United Kingdom, the United States, the Netherlands, and Canada.

The commonwealth’s Ministry of Finance operates its International Ship Registry and an International Business Unit charged with diversifying the economy, expanding the economic base, and generating employment. Dominica’s political stability, lack of corporate or capital gains taxes, open trade and payments system, and superior communications systems are among its most appealing draws for offshore companies.

The International Maritime Act of 2000 governs the shipping industry. The Maritime Administration works in close partnership with Dominica Maritime Registry Inc. (DMRI) to operate “The Flag of Responsibility.” The Dominica Maritime Administration is the enforcement agency for all matters concerning seaworthiness, safety, and seafarer qualification. Legally bound to make the Dominica shipping registry its sole mission, DMRI is uniquely dedicated to its registrants. DMRI’s senior management has more than 100 years’ combined experience in writing and enforcing international shipping regulations. Its board of quality management advisors-comprising a roster of internationally recognized marine safety and pollution prevention advocates-plays an active daily role in ensuring the Dominica fleet takes proactive, cost-effective compliance measures. Their representation of Dominica registrants at the United Nations International Maritime Organization and other international bodies ensures advocacy of unparalleled influence and stature. Input and advice are encouraged through Dominica Shipowners Association and Registry members are welcome to serve on Dominica delegations. The registry employs advanced communication technology to solicit input and provide timely notice of current, pending, and revised regulatory requirements. Affiliation with distance learning and training programs and plans to establish the Caribbean World Maritime Institute for crew education and training are evidence of further commitment to superior marine safety and pollution prevention standards.

The Registry is operated by the Commonwealth of Dominica and the Commonwealth of Dominica Maritime Registry, Inc. (DMRI), located in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. DMRI is an ISO 9000/2001 Certified Company, another testament to our commitment to quality and our customers.

Company Formation

Company formation can be obtained in 24 hours under the International Business Companies Dominica Act of 1988 for international business companies (IBCs) as well as for Foreign Maritime Entities. All companies are required to have at least one director. Annual meetings need not be held in Dominica.
There are no nationality or domicile restrictions for directors. To form an IBC, only one shareholder is required and there is no minimum capital requirement. Corporations may act as shareholders.
Incorporation is handled through Offshore Corporate Registry Inc. in Washington, D.C., which follows the Delaware corporate model. Dominica requires no capital minimum or annual returns.

Incorporation can be completed electronically, by fax, or by traditional means. To incorporate a Dominica company, you must provide the following information: corporation name, share capital, and number of initial directors; directors need not be listed by name, nor must the company state a specific purpose of incorporation. Each nonresident domestic corporation must have a registered agent and address in Dominica, available via the International Trust of Dominica. Companies can hold annual directors meetings anywhere in the world, and officers, owners, and directors' names need not be disclosed. Payment of an annual fee ensures the corporation remains a company in good standing.

A company formed under another jurisdiction may be registered as a Foreign Maritime Entity in Dominica for the purpose of registering its vessels under the Dominica flag. These entities must comply with the laws of the jurisdiction in which they are formed.

Taxation

Dominica does not levy taxes on the income or assets of its corporations or on Foreign Maritime Entities flying its flag and conducting no other business in Dominica. Annual maintenance fees, payable to DMRI in United States dollars, are assessed on the anniversary of incorporation. There is no tonnage tax.

Registration and Documentation

Companies may register with the DMRI office in Washington, D.C. Electronic registration and incorporation via the Internet are also possible at www.dominica-registry.com. Service is provided 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Senior DMRI officials are available for consultation Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. U.S. eastern standard time. DMRI recommends submission of facsimile documentation and notarizations for examination one day prior to registration to ensure prompt approval. Vessels are registered by submission at the Fairhaven, MA or at other satellite registration offices (contact the Fairhaven, MA office for more information).

The following documents must be submitted in triplicate:
Application document (available online or by request)
Proof of ownership (Bill of Sale for existing vessels; Builder's Certificate or Master Carpenter's Certificate for new buildings)
Confirmation of Class Certificate for existing vessels or a Certificate of Seaworthiness or Interim Certificate of Class for new buildings dated within 10 days of registration.
Consent to transfer from existing registry if appropriate
Proof that vessel is free of recorded liens
Proof of liability insurance provided by a member of the International Group of P&I Clubs
Oath of Owner (for non-corporate owners)
Secretary's Certificate listing Power of Attorney
Registration fees

To ensure a smooth transition, DMRI accepts facsimile submissions provided the sender submits original documents within five business days. Once the above information is in hand, DMRI issues a Provisional Certificate of Registry (valid for one year) and Temporary Radio Authority (valid for three months).
Permanent Certificates of Registry are issued once DMRI has received and processed the following documentation:
Certified copies of Certificates of Classification
Commonwealth of Dominica Certificate of Tonnage Measurement and owner's acceptance
Commonwealth of Dominica Load Lines, Marpol, and SOLAS certificates
Corporate or Foreign Maritime Entity certificates
DMRI safety inspection report
Commonwealth of Dominica Ship Radio Station License
Certificate of Cancellation from previous registry
Civil Liability Certificate for Oil Pollution Damage (as necessary)
Relevant name change certificates (e.g., Affirmation of Markings)
Commonwealth of Dominica Provisional Certificate of Registry

Vessels can have as their "home port" either Roseau or Portsmouth.

Fishing Vessel and Yacht Registration
Dominica provides registry services for fishing vessels and yachts. Dominica requires fishing vessels to comply with the Torremolinos International Convention for the Safety of Fishing Vessels (SFV '77) and international fishing conservation treaties, and to carry GMDSS transponders to help reduce enforcement boardings.

Bareboat Charter Registration

Bareboat charter registration in essence temporarily permits a vessel to fly the flag of another country while ownership continues to be registered in the owner's State. It provides a welcome element of flexibility in a number of commercial situations. While registered pursuant to a bareboat charter, a vessel is allowed, with the consent of its owner's State of registry, to fly the flag of its bareboat charterer's State for a period determined by that State's law or, if for a shorter time, by the term fixed in the bareboat charterparty.

The attributes of registration are therefore divided between the registry of the owner (sometimes called the "underlying" registry), and that of its "user," the bareboat charterer.

Bareboat registration is specifically recognized in international law, as reflected in the International Convention on Maritime Liens and Mortgages, 1993, and the provisions of the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea. Under this system, the laws of both the State of bareboat charter registry and the State of underlying registry should contain provisions for maintaining the status of existing mortgages during the period that the vessel is subject to bareboat registration.

The laws of both States should also recognize, at least in general terms, the exclusive right of enforcement and jurisdiction by the bareboat charterer's State, whose flag the vessel flies, of its rules and standards for the enforcement of safety at sea, the protection of the marine environment, licensing, and other duties of the flag State, as outlined in Article 94 of the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea.

Bareboat registry into or from the Commonwealth of Dominica is not available where the laws of the State into or from which registry is sought do not generally coincide with the provisions of the International Maritime Act, Sections 64 through 73. In particular, the laws of both States should explicitly recognize that the law of the State of underlying registry is exclusively applicable to mortgages and related instruments recorded therein.

Bareboat Charter Registration into the Commonwealth of Dominica Flag
Where the laws of both States permit, a vessel registered in another State can be bareboat registered under the flag of the Commonwealth of Dominica, giving it the right to fly the Dominica flag as provided in Part III of the International Maritime Act. Commonwealth of Dominica law will apply to all aspects of the vessel's operation, navigation, and management during this period of bareboat registry. The law of the State of underlying registry (not the Commonwealth of Dominica), however, shall apply to the vessel's mortgage and related recorded instruments, in accordance with Section 68 of the Act.

A notice that a mortgage or related instrument has been recorded in the State of underlying registry may itself be recorded, by the Maritime Administrator, if the parties so desire. During the period of bareboat charter registration under the Commonwealth of Dominica flag, the vessel may not fly any flag other than that of the Commonwealth of Dominica, nor show any homeport other than Roseau or Portsmouth.
In order for the application for bareboat registry to be granted, the vessel entering the Commonwealth of Dominica flag must satisfy the requirements for the issuance of a Provisional Certificate of Registry, except of course for ownership and cancellation from present country of registry. Registration will be in the name of the bareboat charterer. The following are required prior to granting Commonwealth of Dominica bareboat charter registration.

Application for Bareboat Charter Registration
The application for bareboat charter registration should be completed on the application for Official Number, Call Sign and Registration of Bareboat Charter Vessel. The application should be signed and dated by the charterer. The application, with all required documents, fees, and payment of service fee should then be submitted to the representing DMRI office.
Required Documents to be Submitted with Application
Provisional Registration Documents
The documentation for a bareboat charter registration is almost identical to that for an initial registration (see Section 2(B) of this Chapter). The vessel must meet all the requirements for initial vessel registration before the issuance of a Provisional Certificate of Registry, except for:
Proof of Ownership: Registration will be in the name of the bareboat chartering entity, and cancellation from present country of registry is not required.
Charterer's Letter of Request: Copies of a letter of request should be prepared and submitted, typed on the letterhead of and signed by the Commonwealth of Dominica bareboat charterer of the vessel, requesting Commonwealth of Dominica bareboat charter registration, and containing:
The present name and official number of the vessel;
The present country of registry of the vessel with address, telephone or telefax number of the country's vessel registration bureau or department;
The names, addresses and telephone/telefax numbers of the shipowner and vessel's manager;
The names, addresses and telex/telefax numbers of all holders of any registered mortgages, hypothecations or similar recorded charges upon the vessel;
The dates contemplated for commencement, and earliest lawful termination, of the bareboat charterparty.
Charterer's Oath or Affirmation of Undertaking: This is a duly acknowledged letter addressed to the Commonwealth of Dominica Maritime Administration, c/o Dominica Maritime Registry, Inc., (see Chapter V, Section 2(B)) pursuant to Sections 64 & 65 of the Act, containing statements that:
The vessel will not fly any flag other than the Commonwealth of Dominica flag, nor show any home port other than Roseau or Portsmouth, while the vessel is subject to bareboat registration under the laws of the Commonwealth of Dominica.
During the period of registration, the bareboat charterer recognizes that the Commonwealth of Dominica has exclusive jurisdiction over the vessel, in its capacity as flag State.
The bareboat charterer will promptly notify Dominica Maritime Registry, Inc., to the attention of its Vessel Registration & Recordation Division, whenever the charterparty has been terminated for whatever reason or that another country has accorded to the vessel the right to fly its flag.
Within 30 days of the termination of the bareboat charterparty or the current Commonwealth of Dominica Provisional Certificate of Registry, whichever is earlier, the charterer will return to DMRI the vessel's Provisional Certificate of Registry and all other certificates issued to it by or on behalf of the Commonwealth of Dominica.
The bareboat charterer recognizes that, under Section 67 of the International Maritime Act, it shall be liable to pay an administrative penalty as a result of its failure to comply with that section of the Act.

Recordation of Charterparty
Section 66 of the Act requires that the bareboat charterparty be recorded. The original charterparty, together with any annexes, should be submitted, with English translation if in any other language, with proof of due execution (see Chapter V, Section 2(B)), to Dominica Maritime Registry, Inc. Certification of copies of charterparties and related instruments may be made by a notary public or any other officer authorized to take acknowledgments or authenticate documents, as described in Chapter 5, Section 2(B).
Proof of recordation of the charterparty, in the form of a certified copy of such recording issued by DMRI will constitute prima facie evidence of recordation of the charterparty as required by Section 66 of the Act.
Please note that any subsequent amendments or addenda to the charterparty or any subsequent bareboat sub-charterparties must be submitted for recording within thirty (30) days of execution with proof of due execution and English translation, if applicable.
Official certificate issued by the present country of registry setting forth the ownership of the vessel and recorded encumbrances.
Written consents, with proof of due execution, of the shipowner and the mortgagee(s), if any, to the Commonwealth of Dominica registration.
Withdrawal of the Right to Fly Present Flag: Satisfactory evidence that the present country of registry will withdraw from the vessel the right to fly its flag while the vessel is under Commonwealth of Dominica bareboat charter registration.

Bareboat Registry in a Foreign State
Part IV of the International Maritime Act governs bareboat charter registration of a vessel, registered in the Commonwealth of Dominica, under the flag of a foreign State. Under this Part, all preferred ship mortgages recorded in the Commonwealth of Dominica remain in full force and effect, and are governed exclusively by Commonwealth of Dominica law during the period of bareboat registration in the foreign State.
Certificate of Permission: A Letter of Permission for Foreign Bareboat Charter Registration will be issued when all requirements in the following sections have been satisfied.
Application for Permission to Bareboat out of the Commonwealth of Dominica
Letter of Application: A letter of application for permission to obtain foreign bareboat charter registration should be submitted to DMRI. No application form is used. One (1) signed original letter of application should be submitted, containing:
The name and official number of the vessel;
The name, address, telefax and telephone numbers of the bareboat charterer;
The vessel's intended service, the nature of the cargo and geographical regions in which it will navigate; and
The dates contemplated for commencement of the charterparty and for its earliest termination.
Letter of Permission: A Letter of Permission for Foreign Bareboat Charter Registration will be returned to the owner, indicating the consent of the Commonwealth of Dominica to the proposed foreign bareboat charter registration.
Required Documents to Accompany Letter of Application
Letter of Consent of Preferred Mortgagees: If the vessel is already subject to one or more Commonwealth of Dominica preferred ship mortgages, the written consent of each mortgagee to the proposed foreign bareboat charter registration, usually in the form of a letter, must be presented to DMRI.
Owner's Undertaking: This statement is in letter form, and must be acknowledged as generally described in accordance with Chapter I, Section 3(D), and Chapter V, Section 2(B)(2). In the statement, the owner undertakes:
to furnish the existing Commonwealth of Dominica Certificate of Registry to DMRI within 60 days of the issuance of the Certificate of Permission for Foreign Bareboat Charter Registration or within 30 days of the date of commencement of the charterparty, whichever is later; and
to notify DMRI immediately whenever the charterparty has terminated, for whatever reason, or when the owner has otherwise retaken possession of the vessel.

Pursuant to Section 72 of the International Maritime Act and Commonwealth of Dominica Maritime Regulation 28, the Maritime Administrator must have evidence in its possession that both the owner and the bareboat charterer are aware that the Commonwealth's jurisdiction over the vessel has been withdrawn during the period of foreign bareboat charter registration, and that as soon as that period ends, the safety and equipment standards required under Commonwealth of Dominica law, in accordance with the applicable international conventions and agreements to which the Commonwealth is party, will be immediately and fully implemented and observed by the owner. The agreement between the owner and the bareboat charterer, acknowledged in accordance with Chapter V, Section 2(B), must contain the following statements:
Waiver of the Vessel's Right to Fly the Commonwealth of Dominica Flag: During the period of foreign bareboat charter registration, the owner and bareboat charterer will neither permit the vessel to fly the flag of the Commonwealth of Dominica, nor show Roseau or Portsmouth as her home port while the vessel remains in the service of the bareboat charterer under the charterparty, and that the owner and bareboat charterer acknowledge and agree that the vessel shall immediately revert to the jurisdiction and control of the Commonwealth of Dominica when the charterparty is terminated or expires, or possession and control of the vessel is retaken by the owner.

The Vessel's Commonwealth of Dominica Standards will be Maintained: At all times pending the vessel's return to the Commonwealth of Dominica flag, it will be equipped, maintained and navigated to standards which are no less than those laid down in the International Maritime Act and Maritime Regulations, including the relevant International Conventions to which the Commonwealth of Dominica is a party.
Charterparty: As provided in Commonwealth of Dominica Maritime Regulation 29, the charterparty upon which foreign bareboat charter registration is to be based must be submitted for filing at the offices of DMRI.
Authentication of Charterparty: This charterparty, and any amendments thereto, must be accompanied by proof of due execution, which is a statement that the charterparty was signed in accordance with the laws of the country or State in which it was signed, and the signature, name and title of the notary public or other official must be legible.
Proof of Due Execution: Please note that this is a legal certification — not an oath — that the instrument was duly executed by the person signing it. Time and expense may be saved if the charterparty itself is signed and acknowledged before a Special Agent of the Maritime Administrator, who can be contacted at DMRI. Authentication may also be by Hague Convention Apostille or by a notary public or other officer authorized to take acknowledgments.


Filing of Charterparty
Initial Charterparty: A copy of the bareboat charterparty, acknowledged or with proof of due execution, together with all annexes or addenda thereto and any bareboat sub-charter parties, with English translation if in any other language, shall be filed with DMRI. Filing of these documents with DMRI does not make them a part of the public record.

Amendments to Charterparty: Subsequent amendments or addenda to the bareboat charterparty, with an English translation if they are in any other language, are to be filed as provided above together with a letter noting which sections, if any, have been altered, together with consent(s) thereto by the mortgagee(s) of the vessel.

Other Conditions of Foreign Bareboat Charter
Section 73 of the International Maritime Act provides that after the vessel's current Commonwealth of Dominica Certificate of Registry has been surrendered to DMRI, a new Restricted Provisional Certificate of Registry shall be issued, showing that the right to fly the flag of the Commonwealth has been withdrawn. This legally establishes that upon termination of the underlying bareboat charterparty, for whatever reason, the underlying jurisdiction of the Commonwealth shall be reinstated by operation of law. Thus, there is no time that the vessel is stateless. When foreign bareboat charter registration terminates, for whatever reason, the full jurisdiction of Commonwealth of Dominica as flag State is immediately restored by law.

Accordingly, the Provisional Certificate of Registry issued under Section 73(2) of the International Maritime Act, is retained in the custody of the Maritime Administrator during the period of foreign bareboat charter registration, together with the Commonwealth of Dominica Ship Radio Station License.

Vessel and Yacht Eligibility & Survey Requirements

Seagoing Vessels
Seagoing vessels of any tonnage engaged in foreign trade are eligible for registration in the Commonwealth of Dominica.

NOTE: All applications for provisional registration are subject to approval by the Deputy Maritime Administrator. Accordingly, the mere submission of an application for provisional registration does not ensure that a vessel will be accepted for entry into the registry or flag of the Commonwealth of Dominica.
Newbuilding Under Construction

A vessel may receive a Certificate of Intended Registry CDVR-3000a during the period that it is under construction. This allows certain asset-based lending procedures to be accomplished before the vessel's delivery date, and may also be useful in obtaining an export license. Virtually all lenders require that where a vessel is under construction and pledged as security for the owner's debt, it be granted a form of certificate identifying it as part of the financing process. The financing divisions of shipyards are often familiar with local lenders specializing in the financing of ship construction.

Mobile Offshore Drilling Units
The Dominica Maritime Administration/DMRI maintains a separate registry for mobile offshore drilling units (MODUs), tailored to meet their specific needs.

Fishing Vessels
Only those fishing vessels that are operated by an entity resident in the Commonwealth of Dominica and that land their catches solely in the Commonwealth of Dominica will be considered for registration. Special local regulations and licensing apply to such vessels.

Commercial Yachts
To the Administration, any pleasure yacht engaged in trade, commerce, on charter or carrying passengers for hire is a commercial yacht. The registration of commercial yachts is limited to those of 24 meters or more in length. The Maritime Administrator may, however, consider waiving the minimum size limitation and other requirements for commercial yachts less than 24 meters in length given the necessary justification.

As vessels engaged in trade, commercial yachts are subject to SOLAS, Load Line, MARPOL and STCW Convention requirements, as applicable. Furthermore, under SOLAS, any vessel carrying more than 12 passengers for hire on board is considered to be a passenger vessel, subject to the passenger ship rules, regardless of tonnage and irrespective of whether or not it is being presented as a commercial or private pleasure yacht and as such would not be considered for registration as a yacht, but as a passenger ship. Since SOLAS defines a cargo ship as any ship within the Convention that is not a passenger ship, a commercial yacht of 500 or more gross tons that carries 12 passengers or less for hire must be classed by an organization recognized by the Maritime Administrator and certified as a cargo ship under the Convention.

The Administration would prefer those commercial yachts of 24 meters or more in length and up to 500 gross tons be classed by an organization recognized by the Maritime Administrator in order to satisfy the suitability requirements for registration. Submission of a Certificate of Confirmation of Classification will satisfy this requirement.

Private Yachts
The Administration considers any pleasure yacht not on charter or carrying passengers for hire, not engaged in trade or commerce, and being used solely for the pleasure or recreational purposes of its owner to be a private yacht. More specifically, to be considered a private yacht, a vessel is:
In the case of a vessel owned by a corporate entity, one on which the persons on the vessel are employees, officers or shareholders (including beneficial owners) of the corporate entity, or their immediate family or friends; or
In the case of a trust or other ownership arrangement, one on which the persons on board the vessel are beneficiaries under the trust or beneficial owners of the ownership arrangement, or their immediate family or friends;
and in private use.
The registration of private yachts is limited to those of 12 meters or more in length. The Maritime Administrator may, however, consider waiving the minimum size limitation and other requirements for private yachts less than 12 meters in length given the necessary justification.

Vessel Classification
All vessels subject to the Safety of Life at Sea Convention (SOLAS) are required to be classed by a Classification Society which has been approved by the Maritime Administrator as a recognized Organization in accordance with IMO Assembly Resolution A.739 (18). However, vessels registered under the provisions of the Caribbean Code may be exempted from this requirement. The following Societies are currently approved for the issuance of International Convention Statutory Certificates on behalf of the Commonwealth of Dominica:
American Bureau of Shipping (ABS)
Bureau Veritas (BV)
DNV
Lloyd's Register of Shipping (LR)
Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (NK)

Vessel Age
Vessels should not be more than 20 years of age at the time of registration; however, vessels older than 20 years may be granted a waiver for registration on application by the owner accompanied by a written confirmation from the vessel's Classification Society that the vessel is in class and that the Classification Society will issue all statutory certificates to the vessel.

For Non-SOLAS vessels, an opinion as to the vessel's seaworthiness must be completed by a recognized organization and submitted for review by the Deputy Maritime Administrator within 10 days prior to the proposed date of registration and that registration is contingent upon the Deputy Maritime Administrator's acceptance of the survey as proof to the vessel's condition.

Registration applications for vessels 15 years of age or older should be submitted with a Status Report of the vessel's latest Special Survey. Prior to beginning the vessel registration application process, the Special Survey will be reviewed by the Marine Safety Division of the Commonwealth of Dominica Maritime Administration.

Crewing

Dominica prides itself on superior licensing, crew management and related services. In keeping with its mission as "The Flag of Responsibility" DMRI maintains crewing standards that exceed ILO and STCW '95 and other IMO regulations. License and insurance are tracked electronically to ensure ongoing compliance.

Manning certificates are issued by the Dominica Maritime Administrator, and application for manning specifications must be made at the time of application for transfer to DMRI. STCW-certified maritime education and training programs are available to registrants at Dominica's international maritime and tourism training institute. Dominica offers an in-service training program for companies that have a Dominica- approved training program. In Service training results cost savings and significantly reduced time for advancement in grade. A true "Flag of Responsibility" depends entirely on a fully trained, competent, responsible maritime staff. All seafarers must demonstrate compliance with the high standards of STCW.

Crew nationality is unrestricted.

Mortgages

Recordation of Mortgages and Other Instruments
The Commonwealth of Dominica International Maritime Act incorporates a range of provisions for the recordation of security-related instruments and documents of title. Recordation gives notice to creditors, purchasers, suppliers and other parties with an interest in such transactions, and furnishes an internationally enforceable structure for the protection of those legal rights recorded with respect to a vessel of the Commonwealth of Dominica. Preferred status, accorded to a mortgage under Chapter 3 (Sections 74-93) of the Act, gives priority to the lender's mortgage lien over those of certain other claimants.

A vessel, subject to a foreign mortgage lien in its present country of registry, is now permitted to register into the Commonwealth of Dominica flag and have its foreign mortgage lien accompany it into the Commonwealth of Dominica registry. This "tacking" legislation provides for the continuation of the preferred status of the mortgage without interruption. Under the statute, the mortgage's deletion or release of record by the prior State of registry as a condition of the vessel's deletion from that registry does not affect the priority of the mortgage lien in the Commonwealth of Dominica for a thirty (30) day period following the vessel's registration in the Commonwealth of Dominica. If not recorded when the vessel is registered in the Commonwealth of Dominica, a Commonwealth of Dominica mortgage given in continuation of the foreign mortgage may be recorded within such thirty (30) day period, and, in either case, the Commonwealth of Dominica mortgage given in continuation of the foreign mortgage will have the status of a preferred mortgage lien on the vessel with priority dating from the original recording date of the foreign mortgage.

The International Maritime Act, in harmony with the International Convention on Maritime Liens and Mortgages 1993, provides for the maintenance of a public register at which those documents specified in Sections 9, 74, 78, 79, and 87 of the Act, may be recorded. As provided in the Act, such recordations may be made at DMRI. Documents that may be recorded include:
Bills of Sale (Section 78)
Mortgages (Section 79)
Satisfactions, Releases or Discharges of Mortgages (Section 87); Assignments, and other instruments relating to mortgages on Commonwealth of Dominica vessels (Sections 9 and 74).

The Act is designed to facilitate the recordation and enforcement of credit facilities that embody modern asset-based financing techniques. A Commonwealth of Dominica preferred mortgage may secure:
Sale and lease transactions
Contingent and future obligations (Section 81)
Japanese "ne-teito" type of "floating mortgage" facility (Section 81(2))
Advances and repayments
Guarantees

Multiple types of collateralization incidental to the diversified ownership of more than one vessel.

Mortgages or other instruments submitted for recordation at DMRI may be acknowledged as described in Section 2(B)(2) of this Chapter before a Special Agent or a Deputy Commissioner of Maritime Affairs at that office. For the purpose of conducting closings, conference facilities are available at DMRI, if required. A closing may be held at DMRI, by prearrangement, on a 24-hour basis, together with telephone, telefax and email hookup. Documents from closings at other sites may be faxed to DMRI with originals arriving within five (5) business days.

Mortgages are recognized by the international banking community. Expeditious and accurate mortgage service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to ensure timely, uninterrupted operations.

Fees

Initial registration and annual maintenance fees are payable to DMRI. Fees must be paid in United States dollars by a check drawn on a bank or branch thereof located in the United States. Direct transfer of payments is prohibited.

The Commonwealth of Dominica promises competitive, straightforward rates, with no hidden costs. A fee schedule, quoted in United States dollars, is available on the registry's "Fees" webpage.

Contact

Commonwealth of Dominica Maritime Administration
Dominica Maritime Registry Inc.
32 Washington Street
Fairhaven, Massachusetts 02719 USA
Telephone: +1-508-992-7170
Facsimile: +1-508-992-7120
Web: www.dominica-registry.com
Email: neast@dominica-registry.com

Stockholm Agreement 96
IMO Convention 48
* IMO amendments 91 
* IMO amendments 93
SOLAS Convention 74
SOLAS Protocol 78
SOLAS Protocol 88
LOAD LINES Convention 66
LOAD LINES Protocol 88
TONNAGE Convention 69
COLREG  Convention 72
CSC Convention 72
CSC amendments 93
SFV Protocol 93
STCW  Convention 78
STCW-F Convention 95
SAR  Convention 79
STP Agreement 71
STP Protocol 73
IMSO Convention 76
INMARSAT OA 76
INMARSAT amendments 94
INMARSAT amendments 98
IMSO amendments 2006
IMSO amendments 2008
FACILITATION Convention 65
MARPOL 73/78 (Annex I/II)
MARPOL 73/78 (Annex IV)
MARPOL 73/78 (Annex V)
MARPOL Protocol 97 (Annex VI)
London Convention 72
London Convention Protocol 96
INTERVENTION Convention 69
INTERVENTION Protocol 73
CLC Convention 69
CLC Protocol 76
CLC Protocol 92
FUND Convention 71
FUND Protocol 92
FUND Protocol 2003
NUCLEAR Convention 71
MARPOL 73/78 (Annex III)
PAL Protocol 76
PAL Protocol 90
PAL Protocol 02
LLMC Convention 76
LLMC Protocol 96
SUA Convention 2005
SUA Protocol 2005
SALVAGE Convention 89
OPRC  Convention 90
HNS Convention 96
OPRC/HNS 2000
BUNKERS CONVENTION 01
ANTI FOULING 01
BALLASTWATER 2004
NAIROBI WRC 2007
HONG KONG CONVENTION
HNS PROT 2010
Cape Town Agreement 2012
SUA Convention 88
SUA Protocol 88

IMO Conventions

Status of Conventions Dominica

IMO Convention 48 x
SOLAS Convention 74 x
SOLAS Protocol 78 x
SOLAS Protocol 88 x
SOLAS Agreement 96
LOAD LINES Convention 66 x
LOAD LINES Protocol 88 x
TONNAGE Convention 69 x
COLREG Convention 72 x
CSC Convention 72
CSC amendments 93
SFV Protocol 93
Cape Town Agreement 2012
STCW Convention 78 x
STCW-F Convention 95
SAR Convention 79 x
STP Agreement 71
Space STP Protocol 73
IMSO Convention 76
INMARSAT OA 76
IMSO amendments 2006
IMSO amendments 2008
FACILITATION Convention 65 x
MARPOL 73/78 (Annex I/II) x
MARPOL 73/78 (Annex III) x
MARPOL 73/78 (Annex IV)
MARPOL 73/78 (Annex V) x
MARPOL Protocol 97 (Annex VI)
London Convention 72
London Convention Protocol 96
INTERVENTION Convention 69
INTERVENTION Protocol 73
CLC Convention 69
CLC Protocol 76
CLC Protocol 92 x
FUND Protocol 76
FUND Protocol 92 x
FUND Protocol 2003
NUCLEAR Convention 71 x
PAL Convention 74 x
PAL Protocol 76 x
PAL Protocol 90
PAL Protocol 02
LLMC Convention 76 x
LLMC Protocol 96
SUA Convention 88 x
SUA Protocol 88 x
SUA Convention 2005
SUA Protocol 2005
SALVAGE Convention 89 x
OPRC Convention 90 x
HNS Convention 96
HNS PROT 2010
OPRC/HNS 2000
BUNKERS CONVENTION 01
ANTI FOULING 2001
BALLASTWATER 2004
NAIROBI WRC 2007
HONG KONG CONVENTION

x: Accession/ratification
d: Denunciation

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